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I'm at ecstasyandfriends.tumblr.com. congrats, you have found my personal tumblr.

 

filthe:

no one cares if you don’t like short hair on girls shut the fuck up

oppression is not a feeling. reducing it how to a community ‘feels’ they are being treated minimizes the violences that are enacted upon them, makes structural injustices a matter of perception of individual acceptance or rejection of oppressive conditions. oppression creates feelings, definitely. it creates trauma, internalized conflict, dissonance, confusion. but oppression is not a feeling.

Ngọc Loan Trần, quoted in this fabulous Black Girl Dangerous article. 

(via slowdisaster)

browngirlblues:

browngirlblues:

Women against feminism are basically just arguing that their individual lives are fine and they don’t care about what other women go through

This might be my most popular post

Intersex babies are not having difficulty with sexual identity or self-image. The parents are, and parental anxiety about the appearance of a child’s genitals should be treated with counseling, not with surgery to the child.

Elizabeth Weil (via reproductivejusticeatsfsu)

whitegirlsaintshit:

la-liz:

geminichilde:

I can’t help but wonder if the Coke vendor at my Target realizes the awesomeness of what he did.

What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coke, Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.
- Andy Warhol



so did you buy two cokes in the hopes that you could use a foolproof marketing campaign to share a coke with a dead bitch? or naw?

^^^^^^^^^^^^

whitegirlsaintshit:

la-liz:

geminichilde:

I can’t help but wonder if the Coke vendor at my Target realizes the awesomeness of what he did.

What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coke, Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.

- Andy Warhol

so did you buy two cokes in the hopes that you could use a foolproof marketing campaign to share a coke with a dead bitch? or naw?

^^^^^^^^^^^^

The pioneering woman the world forgot

Nokutela Mdima was born in 1873 to a family of Christian converts who were living at an American missionary station in Inanda, near Durban in the east of South Africa.

After graduating from the mission’s prestigious boarding school she worked as a teacher and in 1894 married John [Dube], the son of a local Christian pastor. The couple then moved to the US, continuing their education at a missionary institute in Brooklyn, New York and John was ordained.

She was “young, with blazing black eyes, smooth brown skin and handsome regular features,” says an article first published in the New York Tribune in 1898. “She speaks good English with a deliberation that is charming and in the softest voice in the world. Her manner is grace itself.”

While they were in the US, the Dubes were inspired by the work of the black American educator Booker T. Washington who preached self-reliance - arguing black people had to make economic progress before they could make political progress.

After returning home to Inanda the couple became the first black South Africans to start a school. In 1900 they founded the Ohlange Institute which is still teaching pupils today.

The Dubes created a “national spirit” bringing students from across the country together under one roof, says Prof Cherif Keita, director of the African studies programme at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. “They trained generations of leaders.”

[Cherif] Keita only found out about Nokutela while making a film about John and, feeling she had been overlooked by history, made it his personal mission to set the record straight. He has made a film about her too - Remembering Nokutela will be shown in Minnesota next month with other locally-produced films.

"John’s name was always floating around, but in her case she was wiped out and yet she had been there at every stage of the building of these institutions that were ground-breaking in South Africa’s history," he says.

"Every source that you read on the founding of Ohlange says John Dube founded this school. No he didn’t. John and Nokutela Dube could not have done it without each other," adds Prof Heather Hughes, a South African historian and biographer of John Dube, who has worked with Keita on uncovering Nokutela’s story.

Nokutela started the prestigious music programme at Ohlange, composed songs and formed a choir. She also taught students cooking, house-keeping and tailoring.

"The clothes that the students were capable of making competed with the clothes in the European shops in Durban," says Keita, who argues that Nokutela’s artistic talents were key "to the whole enterprise of both awakening a political consciousness, and preparing Africans intellectually".

They set up a newspaper, produced a book of Zulu songs and popularised the song Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika (God Bless Africa) that became part of South Africa’s national anthem after apartheid.

The Dubes returned to the US at least twice to raise funds for the school - John would speak and Nokutela would perform traditional Zulu songs and play the piano and autoharp - a hand-held wooden box with strings that are plucked.

In 1912, John’s reputation as an educator helped him become the first president of the South African Native National Congress, which later became the ANC. Its purpose was to protest against racial discrimination and call for equality.

Women were not allowed full membership of the organisation when it was founded but there is evidence that Nokutela was “an incredibly important female role model within that movement,” says Hughes. “A lot of historians have [thought] women weren’t involved or they were involved only in very subordinate capacities and I think that’s quite demeaning to women like Nokutela.”

Despite this, all was not well in the Dube household. Nokutela was unable to have children and after 20 years of marriage John had an affair - which led to the birth of an illegitimate child.

Nokutela left him and went to the Transvaal region, where for the next three years she preached the gospel to rural communities, before becoming ill with a kidney infection. When John heard about her condition he brought her to a house they owned in Johannesburg for treatment, but she died shortly after in 1917 at the age of 44.

She was buried in Johannesburg but her grave had no headstone - just a reference number, CK9753 - the CK standing for “Christian Kaffir” (a racist term for a black person, widely used at the time).